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Catching Colors

Age: 0 to 8 Time: Under 1 hour
Materials: "Swatch" book; tempera paints; mason jars; paintbrushes; clear shower curtain; rope or twine
Skills: Creativity, Behavioral Schema, Fine Motor, Sensory, Teamwork

There are few activities that are as liberating and satisfying as painting on a giant canvas. In this activity, explorers draw inspiration from a marvelous book by Julia Denos about a girl named Swatch—a vibrant character who can tame wild colors. Inspired by Swatch's adventure, kids will free colors and create a whirling, swirling outdoor masterpiece.

Watching color splash up on a clear outdoor canvas, feeling it swirl and whirl around, and being welcome to have at it are all the makings for joyful, engaging play—the kind of free and messy play that paves the way for a creative future.

The Guide

  1. Prep your materials: Pour different colors of tempera paint halfway into mason jars, or other containers you don’t mind getting dirty. String a rope through the holes in your shower curtain, and tie each end around a tree or pole. You will want to put a tarp or newspaper down underneath the shower curtain so you don’t paint the grass. You can use a couple of bricks or rocks to weigh down the bottom of the shower curtain so it stays straight while the kids create.
  2. Read about colors: Read Swatch: The Girl Who Loved Color by Julia Denos to your wee ones. After you have finished, ask your explorers in a hushed tone, “I have a little secret. Can I share my secret with you?” Tell them you love color too, and you caught some this morning. Then, bring out the jars of paint and pass them around.
  3. Inspire empathy: Ask the explorers, “How do you think these colors are feeling in their jars? Do you think we can free them? Do you think we can make a masterpiece?”
  4. Free the colors: Give your wee ones paintbrushes and bring them to the shower curtain you set up. Welcome your explorers to free the colors and have at it! Encourage them to paint on both sides of the shower curtain, and explore new ways of painting (with hands, sticks, leaves, and elbows). Take a step back and let them get as messy and creative as they want.

Why is this activity great for kids?

This kind of free, wild and messy play can be difficult to come by for kids today (and not always easy on parents either). But the often misunderstood mess that follows carries so much value. Once you let go, you will see the excitement, joy and engagement such messy play brings to children. And, it turns out, you are enabling kids to develop their senses and benefit from sensory stimulating play, which research shows enhances brain development. Letting kids get messy early on also predisposes them to being comfortable with messy thinking later in life. The ability to think freely and push the limits of a situation is exactly what helps kids build creativity and solid problem-solving skills. Just the simple prompt to think about how colors are feeling helps kids develop empathy--the skill they may need most in life to make and keep friends, navigate social dynamics and learn to balance their own needs with the needs of others.

Do This Activity In A Class

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Do It Yourself

We think all families should be learning outside. Try this activity with your child and begin to see the power in outdoor, play-based learning. Have fun!

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